This map, from the Gauteng City-Region Observatory (GCRO) shows the burgeoning amount of “privately” governed space in the Gauteng urban region.  The GCRO website notes, with concern, that 


"The emergence of privately governed space in Gauteng has increased since the early 1990s and has fragmented the urban form through the transformation of space from open to controlled access. This month’s map depicts the development of privately governed space in Gauteng, which includes gated communities, office parks, boomed-off areas and estates. This form of development has created a series of fragmented cells scattered across the Gauteng landscape, but located mainly in the Johannesburg, Tshwane and Ekurhuleni Metropolitan municipalities. This cellular structure limits the accessibility, movement and integration of individuals in these areas.  The cells are also observed to coincide with areas of low building density".


This is extremely worrying from a right to the city perspective.  While not all privately governed spaces are exclusive, urgent thought needs to be given to how openness, diversity, freedom of movement and freedom of “being” in the city can be maintained and advanced within the region.

This map, from the Gauteng City-Region Observatory (GCRO) shows the burgeoning amount of “privately” governed space in the Gauteng urban region.  The GCRO website notes, with concern, that 

"The emergence of privately governed space in Gauteng has increased since the early 1990s and has fragmented the urban form through the transformation of space from open to controlled access. This month’s map depicts the development of privately governed space in Gauteng, which includes gated communities, office parks, boomed-off areas and estates. This form of development has created a series of fragmented cells scattered across the Gauteng landscape, but located mainly in the Johannesburg, Tshwane and Ekurhuleni Metropolitan municipalities. This cellular structure limits the accessibility, movement and integration of individuals in these areas.  The cells are also observed to coincide with areas of low building density".

This is extremely worrying from a right to the city perspective.  While not all privately governed spaces are exclusive, urgent thought needs to be given to how openness, diversity, freedom of movement and freedom of “being” in the city can be maintained and advanced within the region.

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